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Printed from: http://www.napcrg.org/Conferences/AnnualMeeting/EducationEvents/Preconferences

 

 

PR1: Setting the PaCE: NAPCRG’s Patient and Clinician Engagement Initiative

Jack Westfall, MD, MPH; Maret Felzien, MA; Jessica Sand, MPH


The PaCE (Patient and Clinician Engagement) Project is a NAPCRG special project funded by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) under the Eugene Washington Engagement Award Program. The purpose of PaCE is to develop a robust community of patients and primary care providers working together as dyads with knowledge and understanding of the unique features of patient-centered outcomes research related to primary care.


Audience: The PaCE Montreal Preconference is a 1-day immersion for primary care providers, researchers, and community members to broaden their understanding and capacity around the: 


  • Current state of primary care and primary care research 
  • Advocacy for primary care and patient engagement within the research world 
  • Importance of patient-centered outcomes research 
  • Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) and the need for patient  and clinician involvement in its Merit Review process 
  • Opportunities for patient- and clinician-engaged research: the PCORI
  • Pipeline-to-Proposal development and application writing 

Rationale: Participants are encouraged to come as dyad teams — a researcher or primary care provider along with a patient s/he knows well.  Together these teams will learn the skills needed to get started in advocacy and patient-centered outcomes research, begin to navigate the engagement process and join an engaged community of other dyad teams.  


Day/Time: Friday, November 17, 8:30 am-4:30 pm


Fee: $249 (Fee includes breakfast, lunch and snacks)


Please mark the appropriate box for PR1 on the Registration Form. 


PR2: CASFM 2017 Course on Methods to Advance Primary Care Research

Gillian Bartlett, PhD; Chester Fox, MD;  Lee Green, MD, MPH; Joseph LeMaster, MD, MPH; Christopher Morley, PhD; Maeve O’Beirne, MD, PhD;  Andrew Pinto, MD, MSc, CCFP, FRCPC; Charo Rodriguez, MD, MSc, PhD; Jon Salsberg, PhD;  Allen F. Shaughnessy, PharmD, MMedEd; Hazel Tapp, PhD; Tyler Williamson, PhD; Richard Young, MD

 

Building on the success previous years, this course is organized by the Committee on Advancing the Science of Family Medicine (CASFM) to provide information on emerging research methodologies and/or applying existing methods in novel contexts, so that new researchers or those changing their research focus may further expand their research skills. The course provides a unique educational opportunity to those interested in developing a foundation, expanding, or refreshing their research skills.  


Objective: To provide instruction in various aspects of basic and advanced research methods relevant for primary care. 


Content:  General concepts in qualitative and quantitative research will be made available through online webinars offered in advance of the course.  The full day course will be offered with a general introduction to the work of CASFM in the morning session, an icebreaker activity and an introduction to the working groups followed by a 90-minute concurrent session in the morning and a 3-hour afternoon concurrent session focusing on different aspects of research methodology. Participants will be able to chose from concurrent sessions organized by five of the six CASFM Work Groups including Research Methods (RM),  Health Information Technology (HIT), Practice-Based Research Network (PBRN), Participatory Research in Primary Care (PRPC), and Cost Analysis (CA).


Date/Time: Friday, November 17, 9 am-5 pm


Fee: $249 (Fee includes lunch and breaks)


Please mark the appropriate box for PR2 on the Registration Form.


PR3: Place Matters: Mapping Tools and Data Resources for Doing Population Health (Introductory Topic in GIS)

Mark Carrozza; Michael Topmiller, PhD; Andrew Bazemore, MD, MPH; Keith Gardner; Jené Grandmont; David Grolling; Jennifer Rankin, PhD

Objectives: This INTRODUCTORY GIS preconference session will enhance participants’ understanding about the importance of geography to population health, give a practical understanding of the tools, methods, and data available to do population health research and practice, and consider ways in which care providers can use these resources to inform their practice. 


Content: Place matters to personal and population health. Understanding the community context of patients has become increasingly important in the primary care research domain. In light of the growing interest in this area of research, multiple tools have been developed to help physicians use these concepts at both the research and practice level. This hands-on workshop will introduce participants to a variety of geographic information analysis and data dissemination tools, as well as discuss ways in which community-level data can help inform research and care. Participants will review the existing primary care research highlighting population health and the importance of Social Determinants of Health, access hundreds of community-level data points, and consider how they can begin to use the combination of data and geography to positively affect health outcomes by making changes both at the community level and at the point of care. The workshop will include real-world examples of spatial primary care research and application. 


Method: Didactics, discussion, and hands-on computer workshop using GIS software and web-based mapping applications. We will provide sample data to use in applying concepts taught in the session and incorporate examples from a variety of primary care domains. Participants are encouraged to bring their own examples. Prerequisite Knowledge: None


Date/Time: Friday, November 17, 9:00 am-12:00 pm


Fee: $149 (Fee includes a break and materials)


Please mark the appropriate box for PR3 on the Registration Form. 


PR4:  Doing Population Health: A Hands-On, Geospatial Approach for Creating Service Area Maps and Identifying Priority Areas of Need

Mark Carrozza; Michael Topmiller, PhD; Andrew Bazemore, MD, MPH; Keith Gardner; Jené Grandmont; David Grolling; Jennifer Rankin, PhD

 

Objectives: This intermediate preconference session will build on the introductory GIS session and enhance participants’ understanding on how to do applied population health research, provide strategies and tools for defining their “population,” and allow participants to create their own service area and penetration maps to identify high-need and priority areas. 


Content: It is well established that understanding and addressing the social determinants of health are critical for improving population health, and that primary care physicians play a key role. An emerging number of strategies and tools exist that can help population health researchers explore the distribution of health outcomes and determinants over various geographies. This hands-on workshop will provide participants with strategies for making clinical data actionable to improve population health; topics include - defining the “population,” extracting and aggregating clinical data, mapping service areas and penetration rates, identifying priority geographies, and integrating social determinants of health. 


Method: Didactics, discussion, and hands-on computer workshop using Microsoft Excel, GIS software, and web-based mapping applications. We will provide sample data to use in applying concepts taught in the session and incorporate examples from a variety of primary care domains. Participants are encouraged to bring their own examples. Prerequisite Knowledge: None, though INTRODUCTORY GIS WORKSHOP RECOMMENDED


Date/Time: Friday, November 17, 1:00-4:00 pm


Fee: $149 (Fee includes a break and materials)


Please mark the appropriate box for PR4 on the Registration Form. 


PR5: Scaling up Community Based Primary Health Care Innovations

Martin Fortin and Moira Stewart, PACE in MM

 

In 2013, Canadian Institutes for Health Research funded 12 research teams across the country to conduct programmatic and innovative community-based primary health care (CBPHC) research. This signature initiative mandated the teams to focus on two research areas: (1) Improving primary care access to vulnerable populations (2) prevention and management of chronic disease. Importantly, it also mandated cross-collaboration, building capacity, and scaling-up of successful innovations.


As the teams are entering data analysis and interpretation stage, it is now a proper time for them to share their early findings and learn from one another’s insights and learnings in planning for or experimenting with scale-up. In this meeting, members of the 12 teams, including investigators, collaborators, trainees, and decision-makers will come together to:


  • share the progress, achievements and early findings from each team; 
  • use a group process to identify strategies to scale up innovations;
  • obtain the input and perspective of international collaborators on the potential for scaling-up.

Attendance is by invitation only. 


For information please contact event chair: martin.fortin@usherbrooke.ca. 


PR6: Trainee Preconference

 

Attendees will experience a keynote speaker, mentor speed dating and workshops tailored specifically to their education and research needs. The goal of this preconference is to provide more experiences and education for trainees while facilitating networking among senior and junior researchers. 


Date/Time: Friday, November 17, 11:30 am-5:00 pm


Fee: Complimentary (open to trainee attendees only) 

(Includes lunch and break)